Top singers release an open letter after the revelations of sexual harassment

Some of the biggest names in New Zealand music have released an open letter urging industry leaders – and people at every level – to examine their behavior in the wake of Exposing sexual harassment this week.

The letter, penned by singer-songwriter Anna Coddington and released to Things, Was signed by major artists including Beck Ronja, Anika Moua, and Lord.

Moa said she has also been talking to other artists about creating a “database” of people known to exhibit problematic behaviors, to protect young people entering the industry.

Paul McEsar, the CEO of the music industry, resigned from running the business this week.

Ella Brooksby

Paul McEsar, the CEO of the music industry, resigned from running the business this week.

It comes after Paul McEsar, who runs Penny among others, admitted ‘Crossing professional boundaries’ With the artists like them.

Read more:
* Benee Corporation Director, Paul McEsar, hands over an Aotearoa Music Award, and apologizes for past behavior
* Music industry professionals are calling for change after speaking of its darker side

On Wednesday, it is Was stopped From CRS Management, the company he co-founded, awaits the results of an independent investigation that is promised in the workplace culture.

“We didn’t have a list of potential threats in the industry. If you were a young man at his start, asked to work with a man, then at least they would be able to go back to the list,” Moa said Things.

Singer-songwriter Lydia Cole, left, and Bossum Blues have spoken out about the harassment and abuse of power in the music industry in Aotearoa.

Ricky Wilson

Singer-songwriter Lydia Cole, left, and Bossum Blues have spoken out about the harassment and abuse of power in the music industry in Aotearoa.

She said established names are actively looking for ways to mitigate the harm done to women and gays in music.

“It’s even smelly that we have to do it.”

The group letter, also signed by Tammy Nelson, Mel Parsons and Holly Smith, calls on workers at all levels to leave the industry if they are unable to maintain the dignity of those around them.

The message reads: “If the artist’s job is … to make moving music, then your job should be to help them professionally and personally, without going overboard and taking advantage of them.”

“Men in the music industry have been working in a safe-in-numbers scenario forever. Young women, Takatabawe and other minorities entering the music industry do not have that safety.

“Yes, it is a very difficult career choice. Everyone has to be prepared to check their ego and break their confidence, or vice versa – hugely successful, fans are under their feet, whatever. Either way, artists are ready for some messy times and need to learn to deal with That, and we hope that they have good support around them. What no one should ever deal with – under any circumstances – is sexual harassment. “

Supplied

Alison Maw announced the launch of the #MeTooNZ project, Stuff.

The letter makes a number of suggestions, including recognizing boundaries and agreeing (“If you can’t work within these limits then don’t work”) and refusing to “let it slip” when they witness transgressions.

“Do your best to be right, but always be prepared to be wrong. If someone tells you that a behavior is unacceptable to them, no matter how small, don’t be defensive – learn from them.”

Lord issued a separate statement this week, expressing her support for the artists and professionals who have spoken in the long months. Things Investigation.

Lord (Ella Yelich-O'Connor) pictured in Christchurch during her world tour.

George Heard / Staff

Lord (Ella Yelich-O’Connor) pictured in Christchurch during her world tour.

The former star manager, Scott McLachlan, was one of the men named in the investigation who has acknowledged years of harmful behavior. It was Launched by Warner Music Australia On Sunday.

“I sincerely support Bossum, Amy, Lydia, and anyone in the New Zealand music industry who has experienced systemic imbalances of power.

“There must be changes to these systems,” the singer said.

Warner Music Australasia fired music director Scott McLachlan after admitting years of harmful behavior.

Chris Skelton / Staff

Warner Music Australasia fired music director Scott McLachlan after admitting years of harmful behavior.

Fully open letter

“Music is a powerful force, capable of moving us susceptible humans in all directions. It is difficult, if not impossible, to create moving art without allowing yourself to be weak and emotional at times. It is part of the artist’s job to feel deeply in all directions. In order to create something worth listening to.

“ People in the engine room work in the music industry – studios, venues, festivals, and anywhere that music is made – in conditions where emotions may be high, hours may be long, green rooms may be small, and alcohol is often used as a social lubricant. Or a way to pass the time… these are the conditions of the workplace.

“For everyone in the industry – you know the circumstances. We are all passionate about music and we are regularly in awe of the talent around us. But if the artist’s job is to feel deeply and be weak enough to create moving music, then your help should be both professionally and personally, without going overboard.” And take advantage of it.

“Now is an opportunity to honestly assess yourself and reflect on your behavior in those environments. If you cannot work in these circumstances while preserving the dignity of those around you, then it is time to either find another work environment that you can handle on your own, or take advantage of the various resources and procedures that you have put in place. SoundCheck, Aotearoa and other initiatives to educate yourself and change behaviors – this applies to everyone, in the industry.

“Men in the music industry have been working in a scenario of safety in numbers since forever. Young women, Takatabawe and other minorities entering the music industry do not have that safety. Yes, it is a difficult career choice. Everyone should be prepared to check their ego and shatter their confidence, or vice versa – huge success.” , Fans are under their feet, whatever. Either way, the artists are ready for some messy times and need to learn how to handle it, and hopefully they have good support around them. What no one should ever deal with – under any circumstance – It is sexual harassment.

“We need better behavior than those who have power now, but ultimately we need more diversity in these positions of power so that the music industry as a whole can thrive and reap the benefits of different perspectives. Innovation will follow in both business and creativity – there is a lot more. Research to support it requires active and conscious change, transferring some power from the constraining group it holds now to others who are neither like nor like-minded. We’ve been talking about this and failing to influence change for a very long time, but it can and must be done.

  • Know the limits and consent. If you cannot work within those limits then do not work.
  • Do not accept exceeding these limits from anyone you work with. If you see or hear something don’t let it slide.
  • Check out people. If you suspect someone is feeling uncomfortable – ask them if they are okay.
  • Do your best to be right, but always be prepared to be wrong. If someone tells you a behavior is unacceptable to them, no matter how small, don’t be defensive – learn from them.
  • Diversify your workplace. If you need someone else, actively seek out candidates from different backgrounds and different points of view.
  • Talk to professionals who can help you achieve these goals – there are many. Don’t rely on musicians and others in your field to educate you. This is unpaid work and a surprise – we’re not psychologists or HR professionals and we probably don’t even have the tools you really need.
  • Don’t make public statements without taking private action.

“Imagine making music without women, non-binary, rainbow community, different abilities, Maori, and other ethnic minorities. Imagine if the artists reflect the demographics of the” industry “. Nobody wants that. It’s boring. You can say goodbye to most of the works that we used to. We all enjoy it at festivals this summer for starters – those who helped everyone in the industry recoup last year’s losses. Without an interesting group of people struggling with music. Make it safe for them. Safety – is the minimum every human deserves.

“The burden of change does not fall on those of us who do not possess this power. Everyone should want to make a better, safer and more productive industry. Artists are not here to help you make these changes. We don’t want to write open letters and talk to the media about the inappropriate behavior of others.” We want to work on our music. “

– Anna Coddington, Peck Ronja, Anika Moa, Lord, Tami Nelson, Holly Smith and Mel Parsons

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