Sorry is the hardest word, but gymnasts also want to understand all of their struggles and struggles

Sorry is the hardest word, but gymnasts also want to understand all of their struggles and struggles

A formal apology is a good start for the gymnastics community, but it is more about actions than words as those who have misused the sport search for the narration.

Tony Cumber, CEO of New Zealand gymnastics, on Wednesday Solemnly apologized for the offense Many saw him in the church.

This came after the publication of an independent review of ‘Malicious culture’ In sports, it was discovered by studying things in August 2020.

Dr. Georgia Cervin, a former Commonwealth Games gymnast-turned-academic and attorney, said it was wonderful to see the apology, but “we still did not understand the damage we suffered”.

11092020 Photo: ROSS GIBLIN / STUFF Dr. Georgia Cervin studied gymnastics in New Zealand.

Ross Giblin / Staff

11092020 Photo: ROSS GIBLIN / STUFF Dr. Georgia Cervin studied gymnastics in New Zealand.

“The apology does not express an understanding of any specific harm, but that does not mean that New Zealand gymnastics does not understand that,” she said.

“The true test of understanding the problems and the sincerity of apologies will be measured against future actions for Gymnastics New Zealand. In particular, amplify, listen and prepare to promote athlete-led initiatives.”

Read on:
* * An independent evaluation of the “traitorous” gymnastics culture is important
* * Marathon to change the sporting culture
* * Some members of the gymnastics community feel “neglected and expelled” because the independent trial has been expanded

Servin is one of many former athletes who have campaigned for more than 100 gymnasts, coaches and judges.

The group will meet with the New Zealand and New Zealand Athletic and Gymnastics Federation and the Human Rights Committee next week to collaborate on processes that will help implement some of the review’s more than 50 recommendations.

“It’s about empowering all of the survivors to tell their story, make recommendations and analyzes, have a story and change the sport,” she said.

“… this could be a very important precedent for empowering all women in sport.

“All eyes are on us – we are hosting three world championships in the next three years – now is the time to make big changes in women’s sport.”

Former gymnast Belinda Moore was one of the first to tell her story

Lawrence Smith / Things

Former gymnast Belinda Moore was one of the first to tell her story

Belinda Moore, a former rhythmic gymnast at the Commonwealth Games, said the assessment was a “positive step in the right direction” and that the New Zealand gymnast’s apology was a good start.

Moore was one of the first to tell her story as part of the Stuff investigation.

She talked about how to pressure athletes to be slim and regular “Eat an apple for dinner” And how she is still wrestling with the lingering effects of her exercise in adulthood.

“It’s a big part of realizing that what really happened,” she said.

“It’s huge for NZ gymnastics to take responsibility.”

Moore supported the review when he suggested reaching out to former athletes to help those still in gymnastics.

“It would be wonderful to have that done. It would be rare that they would not use those of us who are and want to … There is still a place to get that knowledge and experience.”

“It’s very nice to write a report, but as a young gymnast, I’d rather listen to someone I can get to know than someone who’s not there and is a little bit far away.”

The health and well-being of the athletes were the focus of the review. Moore said that more attention should be paid to mental health than to physical.

“These components are completely interlinked,” she said.

“We have to watch the mental side of things, mentally in my personal opinion [health] It is more important than the physical because … [what] Your mind knows, sees, and understands what your body will do, not the other way around.

“The mental side … often leaves a lot of scars, too.”

In the Independent Gymnastics Review, the athletes said they attended often

Francois Neal / Getty Images

In the Independent Gymnastics report, the athletes said they often felt that they were “not good enough”.

A former Commonwealth Games athlete who was also part of Stuff’s initial investigation and wanted to remain anonymous, said the publication of the New Zealand Gymnastics Journal for review and subsequent apology was “a great relief … because it was dangerous”. Systemic problems in sports. “

She said, “It is now open and I hope Gymnastics New Zealand now realizes that sport, whether in New Zealand or internationally, needs the Rosa Parks movement and will be proactive to be a catalyst for this change.” .

She said that while many of the 51 recommendations “have resonated”, some of them “remain very vague” and “miss minimal details.”

“I wonder if this crucial opportunity to make more detailed recommendations has been missed if former and current players had a greater impact on the evaluation,” she said.

Roger Mortimer, General Manager of the Athletic Union, said the review was a start.

Things

Roger Mortimer, General Manager of the Athletic Union, said the review was a start.

Roger Mortimer, General Manager of the Athletic Union, said the review was a “beginning” but did not provide a “complete picture” of the state of the gym.

The “most apparent loophole” was the lack of research into the experiences of former gymnasts who “reported physical and mental health problems after their careers as a result of inappropriate and unacceptable behavior by coaches and other officials during their careers.”

He said that the intention of the Athletes’ Federation and the group of athletes it represented was to invite former athletes.

“It’s a missed opportunity. Nevertheless, we fully agree with the reviewers that it is expected that the gymnastics community will be directly responsible for keeping these accounts safe and professional.”

“Unfortunately, we are zero in terms of understanding the experiences of many athletes.”

Dr. Sarah Lieberman hopes to bring positive changes.

David Unwin / Staff

Dr. Sarah Lieberman hopes to bring positive changes.

New Zealand Gymnastics announced that it will work with the group through a new steering committee to help shape implementation of the recommendations.

Mortimer said this is the group’s goal as well, to ensure that athletes and those with “the right expertise” “participate meaningfully.”

“If this group can work with all different areas, I think that would be the best scenario,” he said.

Gymnastics New Zealand has expressed its willingness to make recommendations through “commitment sharing”. In its statement, the organization promised to listen to survivors and address issues from a human rights perspective.

Professor Sarah Lieberman, co-chair of the Board of Directors of Women in Sports Aotearoa (Wispa), said in a statement that the approach of New Zealand gymnastics will lead to positive change.

“Wespa is very encouraged to see New Zealand gymnastics’ commitment to human rights as a result of a review of all sports and the organization’s unconditional apology for all those injured or suffered in their sport,” she said.

“By taking a holistic approach to the sport, rather than focusing solely on athletes and coaches, the systemic change required to restore the current culture within Gymnastics New Zealand will lead to high performance from the ground up.

“Compliance with basic human rights and the ethical standard for engaging with people in sport should have nothing to do with the availability of funding.”

READ  Luxurious World Tour Kindergarten - OA Sport

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *