Solar Storm - Northern lights seen up to US and UK, new magnetic peak expected on Friday

Solar Storm – Northern lights seen up to US and UK, new magnetic peak expected on Friday

A new, milder solar storm consisting of debris from the first eruption that reached Earth on October 12 is expected to appear on Friday.

Another solar flare called CME, or coronal mass ejection, is heading back toward Earth and behind a magnetic storm caused by the release of material from a sunspot called AR2882 that erupted on October 12. This solar flare was reported by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Saturday, October 9, 2021. Streams of aurora borealis images posted on social networks since October 12 attest to this space event, solar storms causing white, green and pink colored hues and purple. The most common color for the aurora borealis remains green.

Coronal mass ejection refers to a massive explosion of matter from the Sun that can cause a phenomenon known as a geomagnetic storm when encountering the Earth’s magnetic field.

The CME associated with the M1 lamp arrived on October 9 as expected early on October 12 UTC. G1-G2 geomagnetic storm conditions have been met and the G2 Watch is still valid until October 12th. The G1 warning continues until 12/2200 UTC. visit https://t.co/9n7phHb5ok for updates. pic.twitter.com/RG71SsjWls

– NOAA Space Weather (NWSSWPC) October 12, 2021

Thus, this new element is supposed to reach Earth on Friday, October 15, this time evoking the Northern Lights, but perhaps no geomagnetic storm.

It has nothing to do with the display of dazzling light that the solar storm has produced over the past few hours.

Even very low latitudes. Parts of the United Kingdom experienced the Northern Lights, as did New York, and in Wisconsin, North Dakota.

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