New Zealand’s Top 3 Podcasts in 2021

With more and more popular radio shows slowly entering the realm of podcasting, there’s never been such a diverse offering of audio content. Whether driving to work or handling a few household chores, it’s simple to turn on a true crime or pop culture show.

Even better, many of today’s most popular podcasts do more than entertain for an hour or two. Podcasts are often also instructive, helping a newcomer learn the ropes without having to pore for hours over reading guides.

For example, podcasting hit a critical mass in 2019, when 90 million Americans reported listening to a podcast each month. One of the most intriguing topics the podcast boom covered was poker. In the early 2000s, multiple vlogs and broadcasting groups began to cover global tournaments, which sparked public interest in the game.

But learning how to bluff and memorizing card values can prove a bit too complex for the average gamer, which has helped poker podcasters find their niche. If there’s interest in a given topic—table games and beyond—there’s probably a handful of experts recording their insights on the matter.

Even better, more and more podcasts are originating here in New Zealand. Not only does the country have unique culture and traditions, but podcasts are one way for people across the North and South Islands to connect. Here are three of the leading podcasts produced in New Zealand as of 2021 and what they offer.

Unique Content: The Aotearoa History Show

Sure, most residents have passed (hopefully multiple) history classes covering the distant and near past of the country. However, this project from RNZ/NZ On Air Innovation Fund takes a more in-depth look at the ancient past.

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The podcast, hosted by William Ray and Leigh-Marama McLachlan, starts with the country’s geological origins. Those who start with the very first episode will be taken on a journey 100 million years into the past, where tectonic forces stir and prehistoric creatures abound.

From there, Ray and McLachlan jump ahead to 850 years ago, when tangata whenua arrived, then moves through Maori history up until the modern day. Leaving no stone unturned, The Aotearoa History Show elevates standard history fare.

Enjoyability: The Matt & Jerry Show

Here’s one for the car ride to work or a morning walk; this project from Dulux and Radio Hauraki delivers on no-fuss comedy. Like any good early-morning show, it’s got content and laughs in equal parts, without overcomplicating subjects before 10 am.

The show is also interactive. Hosts Jeremy Wells and Matt Heath accept story suggestions, song suggestions, and any other feedback a listener feels like sharing. There’s no topic off-limits, but the pair somehow also toe the line when it comes to keeping everything on track.

For example, they cover topics like brushing your teeth at the kitchen sink or how livable Auckland really is, and maybe all on a Chew Your Face Off Friday. Listeners will come away with a smile—but they’ll likely also have learned something new.

Expert Insight: The Property Academy Podcast

As aforementioned, podcasts are also a great opportunity to learn or perfect a new skill or trade without spending too much time hunched over a book or screen. Instructional podcasts tend to work best for topics that don’t require too much investment.

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For example, working on poker skills is easy via podcast because a listener likely already knows the rules. The same goes for real estate—most people have spent an hour or two watching a show on property investment or rehabilitation.

In this daily show, hosts Andrew Nicol and Ed McKnight take what they’ve learned from groups like Opes Partners and Juno Investment Magazine and help average Joes enter the real estate market. If it sounds a bit heavy for newcomers, then keep in mind that the pair have done an excellent job of simplifying complex ideas.

Listeners will hear industry insight related to locations around New Zealand, as well as the philosophy behind investing—and, more importantly, the philosophy behind rebuilding certain locations. In other words, it’s not all about capital, but also about the why and the how behind property management.

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