The Canterbury family ‘shattered’ to discover their first ‘rainy home’

Andrea Kwish thought she made a deal with her first home – until it started raining.

At that point she learned that her new home was “raining inside” as well.

Construction firm Kewish says failed seismic repairs may be the reason the floor of their North Canterbury home has gone out of level, resulting in a sag roof that leaks every time it rains.

It requires EQC to cover the costs.

Read more:
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* Almost half of owners of an EQC managed repair are concerned about the quality of the repair
* The EQC will likely distribute the money as earthquake-stricken Kaikoura residents await action

Kwish says her 7-month-old son, Arthur, was in the hospital with breathing problems.

Dean Williams / Stuff

Kwish says her 7-month-old son, Arthur, was in the hospital with breathing problems.

The leaked home took a heavy toll on Kewish and her family. Her 7-month-old baby was in hospital with bronchiolitis and she left Kwish feeling like a “beautiful mom”.

“It’s heartbreaking.

“I just feel like I’m making my kids sick and sick because I can’t do anything about the roof trying, but we’re not in a position where we can do it.”

Kewish said the family has been struggling with groceries right now, let alone replacing the roof.

Andrea and Corey Kwish with their three children, Arthur, 7 months, Abel, 6, and Arya, 4.

Dean Williams / Stuff

Andrea and Corey Kwish with their three children, Arthur, 7 months, Abel, 6, and Arya, 4.

“It’s always something at the back of our heads, trying to figure out how we can do it,” she said. “It just frustrates us, it’s tough.”

“It’s not a pleasant situation at all.”

Kewish, the photographer, and husband Corey, the retail manager, bought their first home in mid-2019 and paid just under $ 300,000 for it in Oxford, North Canterbury.

Kewish said she grew up in nearby Cust, and wanted her family to grow up there too. Other factors that convinced them to buy were the price of the property, the presence of a section large enough for children to run around, and the presence of more in the country.

When they bought the property, she said, it was agreed there was a rotting window sill where the window had to be replaced.

She said the only flags raised in the building report were moisture in one room and some non-urgent rust in a portion of the roof that would only cost a few hundred dollars to fix.

But when it rained, there were leaks.

A tarpaulin was installed on the roof last year to ward off leaks.

Dean Williams / Stuff

A tarpaulin was installed on the roof last year to ward off leaks.

“Every time it rains, it rains inside, and it’s as if we find a new leak every time it rains,” Koech said.

She estimated that about 10 construction workers and roofers visited her home, and many of them recommended a new roof.

No permanent repairs have been found – she now lives with tarpaulin on part of her home.

Kewish is now working with the Greater Christchurch Claims Resolution Service (GCCRS) in the hope that the EQC will cover the cost of the repairs.

The Kewish family purchased their Oxford home in mid-2019.

Dean Williams / Stuff

The Kewish family purchased their Oxford home in mid-2019.

The EQC wanted to review its original claim on the advice of its builder, Steve Waghorn, who suggested that the original EQC business scope missed earthquake damage and allowed incorrect repair methods.

The original scope of the EQC work determined that there was a $ 5,600 seismic damage.

Community Act participated in the GCCRS, which said an independent building surveyor would need to review the scope of the EQC’s business.

After creating the Givealittle page, Kewish said, a creator offered to complete the report for free and it was in progress.

In an email to Kewish, community law advised her that the report can go either way and the EQC will choose whether or not to accept the report.

In a written statement, an EQC spokesperson said the committee is committed to working with Kewish and GCCRS on the claim.

“We are aware of the difficult situation Ms. Kewish and her family are in with their property.”

The spokesman said the damage from the quake had not yet been determined.

“In the event that new information confirms that the damage to property is the result of an earthquake, EQC will work constructively with all parties to solve the situation,” he said.

Kewish wasn’t confident with an outcome with the EQC.

“I hope so [building surveyor’s report] You push it, but I feel it was going in circles. “

“I lost all hope now.”

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