Republicans condemn Trump’s “plan” to undo the election

The unprecedented Republican effort to upset It was the presidential election I have been convicted of an influx of current and former Republican officials warning of an attempt to sow suspicion Joe Biden Winning and keeping US President Donald Trump in office undermines Americans’ faith in democracy.

Trump mustered the support of dozens of Republican senators and up to 100 Republicans in the House to challenge him The Electoral College Voting when Congress convenes in joint session to confirm the president-elect Joe Biden 306-232 wins.

With Biden appointed to his inauguration on January 20, Trump is ramping up his efforts to prevent the traditional transition of power, further disrupting the party.

Biden's transition spokesman, Mike Gwen, dismissed the Senate’s efforts as being

Andrew Harnick / AP

Biden’s transition spokesperson, Mike Gwen, dismissed the Senate’s efforts as a “trick” that wouldn’t change the fact that Biden would be sworn in on January 20 (file photo)

Despite Trump’s allegations of voter fraud, state officials insisted that the elections went smoothly and there was no evidence of fraud or other problems that would alter the outcome. The countries validated their results as fair and valid. Of the more than 50 lawsuits brought by the president and his allies to challenge the election results, nearly all of them have been dismissed or dropped. He also lost twice in the US Supreme Court.

Read more:
* Nancy Pelosi wins the title of the new US Congress spokesperson
* More Republicans are engaging in Trump’s effort to roll back Biden
* US Vice President Mike Pence asks the judge to dismiss the lawsuit seeking to enable him to cancel the election
* Donald Trump returns to Washington early in a last-ditch attempt to reverse Joe Biden’s victory

In a call revealed on Sunday, Trump can be heard pressuring officials in Georgia More sounds “to find it”.

But some senior lawmakers, including prominent Republicans, are resisting it.

“The 2020 elections are over,” said a statement released Sunday by a group of 10 senators from both parties, including Republicans Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana and Mitt Romney of Utah.

The senators wrote that further attempts to discredit the election “run counter to the will of the American people that has been clearly articulated and only serve to undermine Americans’ confidence in the election results already set.”

Republican Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland said, “Members of Congress’ scheme to refuse to endorse the presidential election makes our system and who we are as Americans ridicule.”

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican, said in a statement that “Biden’s victory is entirely legitimate” and that efforts to sow doubts about the elections “are striking at the foundations of our republic.”

Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, a third Republican member of the House of Representatives, warned in a note to her colleagues that objections to the Electoral College results “set a very dangerous precedent.”

One of the most outspoken conservatives in Congress, Republican Senator from Arkansas, Tom Cotton, has said he will not oppose the January 6 electoral count. “I am grateful for what the president has accomplished over the past four years, which is why I have campaigned aggressively for his re-election. But objecting to approved electoral votes will not give him a second term – it will only encourage those Democrats who want to further erode our constitutional government system.” .

Ted Cruz and Josh Howley led the Senate effort to reverse Biden's victory.  (File photo)

Brian Anderson / AP

Ted Cruz and Josh Howley led the Senate effort to reverse Biden’s victory. (File photo)

Cotton said he favors further investigation of any electoral problems, without counting approved electoral college results.

Other former senior officials also criticized the ongoing attack on the election results. In a brief opinion piece in The Washington Post, the 10 living defense ministers – half of whom served Republican presidents – called on Pentagon officials to implement the transition to the new administration “fully, cooperatively, and transparently.” They also affirmed that the efforts made to involve the US armed forces in resolving election disputes “will take us into a dangerous, illegal and unconstitutional area.”

Citing election results, legal appeals, state testimonies, and the Electoral College vote, the two former defense ministers said, “The time to question the results is over; it is time for the official count of electoral college votes, as stipulated in the constitution and the law.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has warned Republicans of such challenges but said little when asked about them on the Capitol as the Senate opens on Sunday.  (File photo)

Jacqueline Martin / AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has warned Republicans of such challenges but said little when asked about them on the Capitol as the Senate opens on Sunday. (File photo)

The unusual challenge of the presidential election, on a scale not seen since the aftermath of the Civil War, loomed over the inauguration of a new Congress set to consume its early days. The House and Senate meet on Wednesday in joint session to accept the Electoral College vote, a typical routine process now expected to be a protracted battle.

Trump refuses to compromise, and pressure is mounting on US Vice President Mike Pence to ensure victory while presiding over what is usually seen as a ceremonial role during a congressional session. Trump strikes a crowd for a rally in Washington.

The president tweeted Sunday against the vote count and the Republicans are not on his side.

A coalition of senators and elected senators pledged to reject the results.

AP

A coalition of senators and elected senators pledged to reject the results.

Biden’s transition spokesman, Mike Gwen, dismissed the senators ’efforts as a” trick “that would not change the fact that Biden would be sworn in on January 20.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to her colleagues that while “there is no doubt” about Biden’s victory, their mission now “is to convince more of the American people to trust our democratic system.”

Senate efforts were led by Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz. Hawley defended his actions in a lengthy email to colleagues, stating that his Missouri voters were “loud and clear” with their belief that Biden’s defeat of Trump was unfair.

“It is my responsibility as Senator to raise their concerns,” Hawley wrote late Saturday.

Josh Hawley says he will raise objections next week when Congress meets to confirm President-elect Joe Biden's election victory, forcing the House and Senate to postpone - but not in any way change that - the final confirmation of Biden's victory.  (File photo)

Susan Walsh / AP

Josh Hawley says he will raise objections next week when Congress meets to confirm President-elect Joe Biden’s election victory, forcing the House and Senate to postpone – but not in any way change that – the final confirmation of Biden’s victory. (File photo)

Hawley plans to dispute the Pennsylvania tally. But Republican Senator from that state, Pat Tommy, criticized the attack on the electoral system in Pennsylvania and said the results that mentioned Biden the winner were correct.

Cruz’s 11-member Republican Senate coalition has pledged to reject the Electoral College statistics unless Congress triggers a commission to conduct an immediate review of the election results. They are focusing on states where Trump has raised unfounded allegations of voter fraud. It is unlikely that Congress will agree to their request.

The group that formed with Cruz, which provided no new evidence of electoral trouble, includes Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, James Lancford of Oklahoma, Steve Dines of Montana, John Kennedy of Louisiana, Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee and Mike Brown of Indiana. New senators to the group are Cynthia Loomis from Wyoming, Roger Marshall from Kansas, Bill Hagerty from Tennessee, and Tommy Toberville from Alabama.

Trump refuses to compromise, and pressure is mounting on US Vice President Mike Pence to ensure victory while presiding over what is usually seen as a ceremonial role during a congressional session.  (File photo)

Lynn Sweet / AP

Trump refuses to compromise, and pressure is mounting on US Vice President Mike Pence to ensure victory while presiding over what is usually seen as a ceremonial role during a congressional session. (File photo)

The holding of the joint session to count the votes of the Electoral College had encountered objections before. In 2017, several Democratic lawmakers contested Trump’s victory, but Biden, who at the time presided over as vice president, quickly fired them to confirm Trump had won. Protests have rarely come close to this intensity.

This moment is a defining moment for the Republican Party in the post-Trump era. Both Holly and Cruise are potential candidates in the 2024 presidential election, bolstering their alignment with Trump’s base of supporters. Others are trying to shape a different path for the Republican Party.

Pence will watch carefully as he presides over what is expected to be a protracted showdown, depending on the number of challenges faced.

Pence’s chief of staff, Mark Short, said in a statement on Saturday that the vice president “welcomes the efforts of members of the House and Senate to use the power they have under the law to raise objections.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has warned Republicans of such challenges but said little when asked about them on the Capitol as the Senate opens on Sunday.

“We will deal with all of that on Wednesday,” he said.

But the Republicans have simply said they are not planning to join the effort that will fail.

Senator Lindsay Graham said Sunday that his colleagues will have the opportunity to present their case, but that they must present evidence and facts. He said, “They have a high hurdle for removal.”

Congress was loath to interfere with the state-run election systems, which is a longstanding protocol. Countries choose their electoral officials and set their electoral laws. During the coronavirus pandemic, many states have adapted by allowing voting by mail to mitigate the health risks of voting in person. These and other changes are now being challenged by Trump and his allies.

Trump, the first president to lose his re-election bid in nearly 30 years, has attributed his defeat to widespread voter fraud, although nonpartisan election officials and even Trump’s attorney general are unanimous that there is nothing.

The Fifth U.S. Court of Appeals rejected the latest appeal by Rep. Louis Gomart, and a group of Arizona voters, who filed a lawsuit to try to force Pence out of the mere ceremony and formulate the outcome of the vote. The appeals court sided with the federal judge, appointed by Trump, who dismissed the suit.

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