In space, paraplegics will be freed from gravity

In space, paraplegics will be freed from gravity

In November 1951, “l’Observateur”, the predecessor of “l’Obs”, devoted two pages to science fiction and Luis Capas (pseudonym for Michel Pelotin, SF writer and publisher) noted: There is intellectual excitement there, and logical intoxication that never fails to stimulate. » “The New Observer” Many articles over the years have been devoted to SF’s work, especially books, but other times as well, especially cinema.

That is why this summer we offer you to (re)discover several archives of “Nouvel Obs” about authors, works, or more broadly the state of science fiction.

The ‘Sci-Fi Effect’: When the Bogdanov Brothers interviewed 250 people about San Francisco

Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) may have been the author of texts imbued with nostalgia or anguish such as “Fahrenheit 451,” but he was optimistic about the future in general and the future of technology in particular. His June 1986 text, which we republish here, refers to the explosions of the Shuttle Challenger in January and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April. Two major incidents have greatly undermined the dream of complete progress, but the author of “Chroniques martiennes” regrets that “We are now plunged into exaggerated panic at what once seemed to be a wonderful future.”.

Apollo 11: “The Eve of a Renaissance” by Ray Bradbury

Another optimistic view is that

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