Farmers define large areas of the Dordogne region

Farmers define large areas of the Dordogne region

DrThe FDSEA farmers of the Dordogne, the regional branch of the First Agricultural Union, invited themselves, on Thursday, February 1, to supermarkets in the La Cavaille district, in Bergerac, in search of imported products that would compete with French production.

DrThe FDSEA farmers of the Dordogne, the regional branch of the First Agricultural Union, invited themselves, on Thursday, February 1, to supermarkets in the La Cavaille district, in Bergerac, in search of imported products that would compete with French production.

The first stop was Leclerc, where they met the director to defend the “Made in France” cause. “He is making efforts to, for example, take beef from the Bergerac slaughterhouse,” admits President Marie Griffaton. It must be said that we banned him for two days in 2014, and we come to visit him regularly to keep the pressure on. Like what's the point…” They still find New Zealand lamb on sale and breaded chicken from Poland.

Farmers note the origin of the products in many Dordogne supermarkets, as here in front of Grand Frais in Bergerac.

Thomas Junco

For his part, the store manager confirms that the blockage of the roundabouts, which paralyzed the area, had a significant impact on attendance and traffic, reaching, for example, 30% on Wednesday, January 31 alone.

“It shocks me”

At the Grand Fries store in Bergerac, the discoveries were even more embarrassing. While many fruits and vegetables are of French origin, there were also artichokes from Egypt, beans from Kenya or Morocco, tomatoes from Tunisia, and cabbage from Spain and Italy. “In the middle of the cabbage season, almost nothing comes from France, which shocks me,” says one protester.

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Milk producers are also surprised to find bottles of fresh milk from Normandy priced at €2.59, when it is purchased for just 40 cents per liter from French breeders. The farmers emptied their boxes at the roundabout before leaving.

Several entrances to the Auchan commercial area in Marsac-sur-Lille were closed.
Several entrances to the Auchan commercial area in Marsac-sur-Lille were closed.

Vincent Troche

Around Périgueux, the slogans were the same: target large and medium-sized stores one last time before breaking the blockade on the Pont du Cerf roundabout and the A89 road. Hands in our pockets, a merchant from the Auchan district, in Marsac-sur-l'Isle, looks approvingly at the farmers. Who block the first entrance, next to Cultura. “It took them a while to get here. The dice have been loaded, and they are in the hands of the big dealers.

“We will come back to see you”

The parking lot is full in Marsac and the exits are closed. The gas station roundabout bears the brunt of farmers' anger. A roundabout away, there is the agricultural machinery at Chancelade, in front of the Lidl store, where the access road is closed in turn. “We hope you will respect the Egalim law now,” Nicolas Lagarde, head of the FDSEA's livestock division, tells Thierry Vivant, trade director, who came to meet the protesters.

The manager, who “does not condone” littering, says he understands the farmers, but the selection of products on the shelves “is not the case.” [sa] Efficient.” “I know how to make it work,” he says, pointing to his store. On the same day, operators also targeted Promocash in Polazac-Ile-Manoir, where the manager opened his store’s doors to them. “We understand some things better, but no Harm from continuing to press,” defends Tom Fiat, from Jeunes Agriculturs.

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In front of Lidl, Nicolas Lagarde and Thierry Vivant parted ways by shaking hands. The first did not fail to add: “Today is beautiful, but if necessary, we will come back to see you, large and medium-sized stores.” »

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