Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless Gaming Headset Test: Microphone with excellent quality

Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless Gaming Headset Test: Microphone with excellent quality

The HS80 RGB Wireless opens a new design direction for Corsair, which experiments with a dual collar system consisting of an adjustable elastic strap, with a choice of cleaner, more modern lines. Despite this desire for change, the manufacturer still took the opportunity to give a bit of a nod to its old Void series headphones by pairing a pair of trapezoidal, RGB-lighted (customizable, unlockable) earbuds.

Package Contents: HS80 RGB Wireless, USB-A Adapter and 190cm USB-A to USB-C Cable.

In addition to these aesthetic considerations, the HS80 RGB Wireless is primarily composed of plastic elements of excellent craftsmanship, complemented by aluminum hinges that enhance the robust look of the whole. The fluffy fabric covered ear cushions and the strap that forms part of the headband can be removed very easily from the headset for maintenance or replacement. So the assembly quality is there and there is no structural weakness to be mocked…or nearly. In fact, the two small connecting cables that run between the headband and ear cups can be a weak point, especially while transporting the helmet – and no protective cover is provided elsewhere. In addition, the gooseneck microphone is not detachable.

With a dual headband and ear cup design, the HS80 RGB Wireless provides an overall good feeling of comfort. The tape contributes to a good distribution of contact points and the weight of the helmet, while the earcups provide a particularly soft contact, while providing a good sound insulation/ventilation ratio. Contrary to what trapezoidal earbuds can do for Void headphones, the earbuds on the HS80 RGB Wireless provide enough room to accommodate their ears, whether in width, height or depth, and we welcome that.

Some points were still worth improving. Firstly, the weight of the helmet remains quite high (367 g) and can be felt during long sessions of use; Especially at the back of the neck. In addition, the helmet is not very suitable for large heads, because in the absence of adjustment of the main arc and a small space between the arcs, the upper part of the head is treated very quickly. The benefit of the bracelet. Finally, and to a lesser extent, we also estimated that the atria rotate more generously on the vertical axis until they rest more evenly around the ear; These are more explicitly supported in the Temple.

The length of the elastic headband can be adjusted thanks to a scratching system that is fairly easy to understand, even if not the most intuitive.

The length of the elastic headband can be adjusted thanks to a scratching system that is fairly easy to understand, even if not the most intuitive.

As a logical consequence of the change in audio design, the HS80 RGB Wireless takes very little from the sonic characteristics of its predecessor, the HS70 Wireless. However, its performance is not more impressive: the show surely gains a bit of subtlety, but unfortunately it loses balance.

Frequency response measurement (normal to 94 dB SPL, at 1 kHz) - without equalizer (black), with custom EQ (orange).

Frequency response measurement (normal to 94 dB SPL, at 1 kHz) – without equalizer (black), with custom EQ (orange).

The biggest drawback of this HS80 RGB Wireless really has to do with the treatment intended for the high-middle: the very wide, clear drawback in the presence area (between about 2 and 5 kHz) – and to a lesser extent the treble shy – overall gives a decidedly very soft sound rendering, but is also very muffled. and not sharp. This behavior also has a consequence on the perception of sources in the foreground which always seem to be far away: it is difficult to assess the distance and path of a source approaching us in play, for example. Some may also blame the headphones for a slight lack of depth and bass impact. As is often the case, the companion app equalizer comes to the rescue and allows the user to compensate for some of these various weaknesses for a more acceptable result, but still far from real satisfaction.

Membrane reaction measurement: square waves at 50 Hz.

Membrane reaction measurement: square waves at 50 Hz.

Membrane reaction measurement: square waves at 500 Hz.

Membrane reaction measurement: square waves at 500 Hz.

Although the overall accuracy is slightly higher than that of the previous model, it is still perfect. The midrange sound reproduction is cleaner and more patterned, however, the bass is still quite chaotic and whistling phenomena are sometimes heard in the vocals.

Harmonic distortion measurement (measured to 94 dB SPL, at 1 kHz).

Harmonic distortion measurement (measured to 94 dB SPL, at 1 kHz).

On the peripheral virtual side, fortunately, the HS80 RGB Wireless provides us with the unconvincing solution chosen in previous Corsair models by licensing Dolby Atmos for Headphones, one of the most compelling virtualization algorithms currently. The headphone’s intrinsic performance doesn’t really honor the theater soundtrack that was said, but month in, this virtualizer has the advantage of staying natural, unlike the others.

READ  What do you think about the design of the Google Pixel 6?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *