America’s Cup: New Zealand crush the 100 km / h mark

Team New Zealand's T. Riotai shows off his impressive speed on a full trip during the recent World Regatta.

Core 36 | Borlenghi Studio

Team New Zealand’s T. Riotai shows off his impressive speed on a full trip during the recent World Regatta.

The New Zealand team, America’s Cup defenders, fired a cross-arc of their rivals with claims that they had broken the 100 km / h mark in training.

This disclosure came in an article in a respected French magazine Paris Match That looked at France’s impact on the current 36th American Cup in Oakland this summer.

France does not have any direct entry but there is a lot of French involvement behind the scenes, including Guillaume Verdier, a successful marine engineer for the Emirates Airline team in New Zealand.

Ricky Wilson / Staff

The first official American Cup practice

Verder was with the New Zealand team in America’s last three Cups – helping the 72-foot giant boat meet the 2013 San Francisco expectations, as he worked on a successful 50-foot cycling catamaran that recovered the 2017 Old Bermuda Cup, and now brings His skills are to the table to produce the stunning 75-foot monocoque.

Read more:
* America’s Cup: The New Zealand Team Riddle – What We Know and What We Don’t Know
* Plans for more American Cup warm-up races have been abandoned
* America’s Cup: Italians claim Luna Rossa owns the New Zealand team scale

“If we want to enjoy the single-hull tour, we will have to … remove the bar. That idea was almost intuitive,” Verder said in the latest issue of Paris Match.

The performance levels of these giants continued to dazzle, although the difference was murky about the top speeds they achieved.

READ  The "big glowing thing" was an electronic missile

The Paris Match The article claimed, “During a training session, the Kiwis boat scored 56 knots (103.7 km / h) on the odometer.” This appears reasonable given that the defenders had often trained under the strong winds.

The Emirates Airline New Zealand team recorded the top speed of 49.1 knots in world regattas.

Fiona Goodall / Getty Images

The Emirates Airline New Zealand team recorded the top speed of 49.1 knots in world regattas.

Te Rehutai recorded top speed in the celebrated regatta of the latest World Series, Clocking 49.1 knots (90.1 km / h) on the opening day when the southwest wind blew between 15 and 19 knots.

Things It is understood that the first generation New Zealand AC75 Te Aihe team scored 51.1 knots (94.6 kmph) during training and Kiwis Team has made significant gains with the design and performance of their new boat since then.

Wind limits for the Prada Cup Final and Copa America are set at 23 knots and teams expect 50 knots (92.6 km / h) to be broken regularly if the wind blows at the high end.

Freddie Carr, the veteran British miller aboard the British INEOS UK team, predicted that 55 knots (101.8 kilometers per hour) could be achieved during the bears’ challenging movement at the top of the marks as the boats rotated and the wind accelerated.

All three contenders acknowledged that the New Zealand team showed the speed advantage during the first taste of the official race in these AC75s, which were held over the four days before Christmas.

There is plenty of time for development by all four unions, but it was a promising sign for New Zealanders in a contest where the gold formula says constantly: The fastest boat always wins.

Verdier is a genius at yachting frustration revolution and has had remarkable success in getting large boats out of the water and moving quickly.

His frustrating designs dominated the current Vendee Globe non-stop around the world race.

He designed a foil version for the 60-foot yacht to be presented to the popular Ocean Race event on world teams taking place in its 14th edition, starting in October 2022.

Written By
More from Arzu

The best Android phones to buy for 2021

Today’s flagship Phone Manufacturers are innovating and developing faster than ever, with...
Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *